Your employee intranet: 5 telltale signs it’s time for a new one

Information is hard to find. Content isn’t useful, it’s boring. If you’ve heard this from employees about your intranet, it’s probably time to overhaul your site. An interactive employee intranet can connect and educate staff and help meet your organization’s goals. In a world where 70 percent of U.S. employees are not engaged at work, it’s crucial to use every tool at your disposal to build engagement.

Suspect employees are shunning your employee intranet? Here are five telltale signs.

1. What intranet?

Most employees don’t even know an intranet exists, and those who do go elsewhere for information. When earnings come out, for example, employees go to Google to read about your performance. That’s a missed opportunity. The best intranets are a go-to source of information. They’re informative, useful and reliable.

2. Employees are wasting time

Employees who navigate your site can’t find the information they’re looking for. They’re frustrated by spending way too much time on the intranet. Your search function returns irrelevant results. Employees don’t enjoy being on the site — it’s clunky and lacks arresting graphics.

3. You’re getting hardly any hits

Getting few clicks tells you that information is static. You’re providing information employees can live without. New content is key. Add blogs from leaders, event recaps and crucial tools, such as an employee directory. And don’t forget to update. There’s no value in a 2013 vacation schedule.

4. It’s hard to update

Posting new content should take minutes, not days. If it’s taking too long and the technology isn’t intuitive, it’s time to rethink your site’s structure and your platform. Is your technology outdated? Is it too expensive?

5. Employees’ inboxes are flooded

An employee intranet should reduce email clutter by serving as a central spot for key messages and news. If it’s not, that’s a sign you need to rethink your strategy.

Keep these five symptoms in mind when diagnosing your intranet, and you’ll be on your way to creating an efficient, engaging and invaluable resource for your employees.

Deborah Lynn Blumberg has a decade of experience writing business and finance topics for The Wall Street Journal, Barron’s, The Christian Science Monitor and Newsday. She was a Knight Center fellow and a Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism fellow and is a member of the American Society of Journalists and Authors.

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