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You’re in a dilemma. You’ve just received the results of a sentiment analysis survey conducted with customers. The results were, shall we say, less than great. So how exactly do you go about sharing those results with other business units without hurting morale?

 

Sharing results like this — even when they’re less than stellar — opens up opportunities for employees to learn and to factor the feedback into upcoming decisions and plans.

 

Cultivating internal transparency, which means sharing information with the business units it might affect, creates important occasions for refocusing on areas that may be weak and exploiting areas that may currently be overlooked but offer a chance for growth.

 

An employee sentiment survey commissioned by BetterWorks found that 92 percent of workers said they would work harder if employees at their companies knew each other’s goals. That’s a hard number to ignore.

 

The same survey found that most employees don’t feel their employers’ goals are transparent. Without internal transparency, workers may be missing the motivation they need to contribute most meaningfully and effectively to the overall good of the company. The good news is that as companies modernize, becoming more open and collaborative, internal transparency should increase.

 

Finding out and sharing how customers really feel — even if it’s negative — can be the first step in changing things for the better. Having an open dialogue with other business units about the results is critical to encouraging teams to work together for the greater good of your organization. For example, by monitoring sentiment and then communicating the results before widely launching new products or services, missteps might be avoided.

 

So, share the results of a sentiment analysis with departments that can make good use of the information. Being transparent with the information helps bring about positive change that can help fuel growth.

Michelle Messenger Garrett is an award-winning writer, content creator and public relations consultant with more than 20 years of agency, corporate, startup and Silicon Valley experience. Her articles have been featured in Entrepreneur, and she’s a regular contributor to leading PR blogs Ragan’s PR Daily and Muck Rack. Garrett was named a Top 100 PR Influencer by Onalytica and was recently named to the board of the newly formed National Organization of Women in PR USA. Her blog was recently named a Top Small Business Marketing Blog.

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